Kering : Changing the job search comes at a cost to usability

Kering’s previous job search tool was an example of how to make things easy for jobseekers – but its latest version does not match up

 


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The Site

Kering, the France-based luxury goods group, has changed its job search and application system, which is linked from a page called ‘Job Offers’ within its Talent section.

A short introduction appears, with a clear ‘Click Here’ button beneath it. This then takes the user to a separate site in a new window, provided by a third party with partial Kering branding. On it jobseekers can search using keywords or by various filters such as job category or location. They can also change the language of the entire job search via a dropdown in the header, although this does not change the language of the jobs returned by the search, which varies.

Previously, the job search and application system appeared to be part of the site (although still provided by a third party), with the job search mechanisms appearing within the Job Offers page. The old system provided more search options and tools than the current one, most notably the ability to filter available jobs by any of Kering’s brands, and posting date.

The language filters also worked differently: changing language not only changed the language of the mechanisms, but also narrowed down the search results to those jobs posted in that language, helping jobseekers to see appropriate positions for their preferred language.

The Takeaway

Kering may have changed its job search and application provider for sound business reasons – such as cost efficiency, integration with other HR systems, or better performance on search engines or other job platforms – but it has harmed the user experience.

The previous version, although also provided by a different third party, was styled to make the user feel that they were still within the Kering site, and provided a more seamless experience. Jobseekers would likely not have felt as if they were being shipped off to an external and more weakly branded site as they are now.

But of course the main practical differences are in the inferior search filters and tools now available. Given that jobseekers are most likely the biggest audience on the site, with over two thirds of those likely to have come just to search for a job, then making their task harder will endanger the company’s brand perception* – and make it more difficult to attract the best talent.

*Data from Bowen Craggs survey data which indicates that 69% of corporate website jobseekers come specifically to search for a job; and that goal achievement affects brand perception: only 24% of those who failed their task leave with better brand perception.

 

http://www.kering.com/en/talent/job-offers
First published 12 November, 2018
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